Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Thusness

I've been thinking a lot about how we all go into the Zendo every morning and what might be happening on the many cushions to my right, left, in front, and behind me. We're supposed to be practicing Shikantaza- thinking-non-thinking-or at least trying to approach that. But I love what Katagiri roshi said about that, something like, "You know, for 30 years I've been trying to practice Dogen's Shikantaza...then I realized that it doesn't exist!"

I'm convinced that anyone who sits will have kensho experiences, is opening up, and is a sitting Buddha. It's either that, or they're insane. We sit two 40 minute periods every morning at 4:45am, and something beyond the Ino's watchful eye inspires us to show up. We might not be able to put it into words, but something is transforming for us.

Why is everyone having kensho? Because it doesn't involve "you." You might not remember it, but I think it's remembered somewhere, somewhere where all is clear and nothing dies and nothing is born.

The worse you are at sitting Zazen, the better! I'm so bad at sitting Zazen, I give up right away. And when I hear that voice say, "I quit" I think good, get out of the way.

Hail to the Worst Horse!



2 comments:

  1. Ajahn Buddhadasa, one of the preeminent Thai monks of the last century, has an article where he asserts that everyone, not just meditators but everyone, has many, many little moments of nibbana every day, all the time. Nothing extraordinary, just moments where greed, hate, and delusion are absent. And that if we didn't have those, if we didn't get little breaks from the otherwise constant "me-ing and my-ing" of our minds, we'd be insane.

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